From Teaching Tolerance:  Who Decides What’s “Civil”?

This is a fantastic short article geared towards teachers.  It’s also a great reminder of what a wonderful resource the website, Teaching Tolerance is.

In the piece, we are reminded of the intersecting meanings of being “civil,” meanings that may have to do with a mutual respect, but also may be couched in colonialist stories about “savages.”  So, in just one word, students and teachers alike might find a radical connection between Black History in the 20th century– the so-called “Civil Rights Movement”– and the anti-colonialist struggles of indigenous people in the Americas.  Brilliant!

I am reminded again of Wayne Ross’s  conceptualization of K-12 social studies curriculum in terms of a focus on “dangerous citizenship.”  My hunch is that this configuration of citizenship education has applications even more broadly across curriculums.  What I am trying to get at, I think, is the necessity of historicisation of curriculum, or the necessity of teachers’ bringing a historical awareness to their lessons– whatever they are teaching.  It’s a historicity that need not be confined to social studies, but one which includes things like etymologies (in the literal, linguistic sense of the histories of the meanings of words) as well as the historiographies of curriculum– the changing ways in which teachers and students have thought about their lessons over time.  Such a historicisation is the big first step in bringing the focus of public education back to the progressive as well as more radical social reconstructivist aims that have guided it since the beginning.

When acts of protest are met with calls for civility, it’s a good idea to give students some historical context about the concept.

Source: Tolerance.org Who Decides What’s “Civil”?

How Can We Build Anti-Racist White Educators?

One teacher reflects on what he and other white educators need to understand as they work to build anti-racist practices and identities.

Source: How Can We Build Anti-Racist White Educators?

This is a great, short piece from a periodical that I subscribe to online called Teaching Tolerance.  The title is a little misleading– or maybe it’s kind of a bait-and-switch. That is, I think the editors went with the word ‘tolerance’ because this more passe term gives you alliteration with ‘teaching.’  But don’t fooled, the contents is a much more robust anti-racism than the title would suggest.  However, the articles and hands-on, project-based, deeply reflective pieces in Teach Tolerance make it accessible across a broad spectrum of teachers, including those who may not be as well versed with the latest radical jargon etc., but teachers who are committed to making their teaching more just.

Also, this piece reminded me how much I really need to read more deeply in James Baldwin’s oeuvre.