Living In The Beautiful Bubble Of The Not-Quite Internet – BuzzFeed News

When I started college in 1999, the digital revolution was in its awkward infancy. That awkwardness gave rise to moments of lovely serendipity — and pockets of blissful ignorance.  By Anne Helen Petersen

Source: Living In The Beautiful Bubble Of The Not-Quite Internet – BuzzFeed News

Dorothea Lange’s Censored Photographs of FDR’s Japanese Concentration Camps — Anchor Editions

The military seized her photographs, quietly depositing them in the National Archives, where they remained mostly unseen and unpublished until 2006.

Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother photograph from 1936 Dorothea Lange—well-known for her FSA photographs like Migrant Mother—was hired by the U.S. government to make a photographic record of the “evacuation” and “relocation” of Japanese-Americans in 1942. She was eager to take the commission, despite being opposed to the effort, as she believed “a true record of the evacuation would be valuable in the future.” The military commanders that reviewed her work realized that Lange’s contrary point of view was evident through her photographs, and seized them for the duration of World War II, even writing “Impounded” across some of the prints. The photos were quietly deposited into the National Archives, where they remained largely unseen until 2006.

Source: Dorothea Lange’s Censored Photographs of FDR’s Japanese Concentration Camps — Anchor Editions

Podcast Episode 36: But WHY!!! Would You Learn a Language? by Fluent Language

A feedback question from James led us to discussing why we chose the languages we are learning right now.

From the email announcement about this podcast episode:

Do you think you’re a crazy person for learning a language?
Do you ever get asked why you would possibly spend your time doing this?
If you’re learning a language and you “don’t have to”, other people think you’re nuts.
Yep, totally bananas. And when you’re busy as hell and trying to sneak in 5 minutes of flashcards at the supermarket till, you may feel tempted to agree.
But I don’t think you’re crazy. I know how it feels when you first speak to someone in their own language and have genuinely made their day. It’s unbeatable to have that conversation in another language. It’s probably as close to space travel as most of us will come.

***

Interesting podcast and blog, which I have recently begun cluing into when a topic strikes my fancy.  Something about the comparison between language learning and space travel (the transcendent perspective both activities promise perhaps) really struck a chord with me.  From when I was very little up until I went to college I fantasized about space travel a lot, and even very seriously (to the point of visiting NASA headquarters in Washington D.C., my senior year of high school) considered pursuing a space-related career.  Eventually, through the tough reality checks provided by my undergraduate education, however, I eventually landed on English and Linguistics as a course of study.

Am I just a BAD POLYMATH?  How far do my abilities actually go to support my interests in these seemingly disparate subjects.  Or is there some kernel of who I am that has subconsciously been pursuing a common thread all along this winding educational path.  If so, what is that common thread exactly?  And what if anything does this reflective exercise I am engaged in mean for me now, as an EFL teacher, and bilingual parent?

In any event I was happy to come across this beautiful comparison between language and space travel because, on the surface at least, it seems to tie up several of my loose ends.  I have a lot of loose ends at the moment.

 

Source: Podcast Episode 36: But WHY!!! Would You Learn a Language? by Fluent Language

At Okinawa Protest, Thousands Call for Removal of U.S. Bases – The New York Times

Organizers said the protest, billed as a memorial for a woman who was killed, was the largest demonstration against the United States’ presence in two decades.

Source: At Okinawa Protest, Thousands Call for Removal of U.S. Bases – The New York Times