The Mythical Whiteness of Trump Country | Boston Review

Source: The Mythical Whiteness of Trump Country | Boston Review

This is a fantastic critique from the Boston Review of J.D. Vance’s bestselling HIllbilly Elegy.  I ordered copy of this book about a year ago after Trump’s victory, but it ended up being out of stock, and I never re-ordered it.  Now I’m kind of glad I didn’t bother.  It would appear that Vance is a little light on progressive populism, and his ethnography is weighed down by a racist mythology of the Scotch-Irish settlers of Appalachia.  Elizabeth Catte rightly points to the diversity of this region, which Vance apparently erases in puffing up his “‘hillbillies’ as a unique specimen of white woe.”

Living In The Beautiful Bubble Of The Not-Quite Internet – BuzzFeed News

When I started college in 1999, the digital revolution was in its awkward infancy. That awkwardness gave rise to moments of lovely serendipity — and pockets of blissful ignorance.  By Anne Helen Petersen

Source: Living In The Beautiful Bubble Of The Not-Quite Internet – BuzzFeed News

Japanese Leader’s Pearl Harbor Visit May Not Be a First, After All – The New York Times

Japan said Shinzo Abe would be the country’s first prime minister to visit the site of the attack, but it now appears that historic occasion actually took place in 1951.

Source: Japanese Leader’s Pearl Harbor Visit May Not Be a First, After All – The New York Times

Dorothea Lange’s Censored Photographs of FDR’s Japanese Concentration Camps — Anchor Editions

The military seized her photographs, quietly depositing them in the National Archives, where they remained mostly unseen and unpublished until 2006.

Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother photograph from 1936 Dorothea Lange—well-known for her FSA photographs like Migrant Mother—was hired by the U.S. government to make a photographic record of the “evacuation” and “relocation” of Japanese-Americans in 1942. She was eager to take the commission, despite being opposed to the effort, as she believed “a true record of the evacuation would be valuable in the future.” The military commanders that reviewed her work realized that Lange’s contrary point of view was evident through her photographs, and seized them for the duration of World War II, even writing “Impounded” across some of the prints. The photos were quietly deposited into the National Archives, where they remained largely unseen until 2006.

Source: Dorothea Lange’s Censored Photographs of FDR’s Japanese Concentration Camps — Anchor Editions

The Spanish Lesson I Never Got at School – The New York Times

This is a great piece by Héctor Tobar, a Journalism professor at the University of Oregon.  By telling a personal story about his growing up in Los Angeles and the effect that had and interweaving some education policy talk, Tobar illustrates the important connection between bilingualism and political power.  Policies like the one in effect until recently in California literally silence minority communities.

This is part of the broader picture I’m beginning to see of bilingualism as a type of resistance that is radical in its unifying power and transgressive in its rejection of dominant culture.  Of course, in my local situation, in Japan, the power structure is turned upside-down.  So, my struggle, strangely enough is teaching my children English against the background of Japanese majority culture and language.  But, of course, globally, Western European (White), colonial, English-speaking is the giant.  I suppose everywhere you go will have its own unique language situation with various kinds and levels of dominance and resistance being played out.  In North America its pretty much English versus all-comers.  And this California law is recognition of the diversity of the United States and a victory for what might be called linguistic justice.

Source: The Spanish Lesson I Never Got at School – The New York Times

30 Years of “Doonesbury” on Donald Trump: Cartoonist Garry Trudeau on the GOP’s “Natural Born Toon” | Democracy Now!

Cartoonist Garry Trudeau has been writing about Trump and a possible run for the presidency for nearly 30 years, prompting Trump to call him “a third-rate talent,” “a sleazeball,” “a jerk” and “a total loser.” Trudeau is the creator of the popular comic strip “Doonesbury” and the first cartoonist to win the Pulitzer Prize. In September 1987, Trudeau published a series of comic strips that now seem prophetic. In one strip, reporters ask Trump a series of questions about his political ambitions to run for Congress, and Trump responds, “President, think president.” Trump has remained a frequent character in “Doonesbury” ever since, giving Trudeau a chance to make fun of everything from Trump’s hair to his ego to his rampant use of insults. His cartoons have just been collected in a new book titled “Yuge!: 30 Years of Doonesbury on Trump.”

Source: 30 Years of “Doonesbury” on Donald Trump: Cartoonist Garry Trudeau on the GOP’s “Natural Born Toon” | Democracy Now!