Greatest Hits Vol. 2

about this site

I was working on this website beginning around the beginning of my first semester at UBC.  In particular, the quotations on the “about this site” page (linked above) are a good representation of the various voices in EDucational STudies that resonated with my own voice at that time.  Here again, you can see an evolution.

The purpose of this site has always been to be a of part of the public at the margins, less obviously dominated by capital interests.  Naturally, it takes time to maintain a blog.  There are long stretches when I was exclusively posting NYTimes headlines that I thought were important to remember at the time.  Looking back at some of those blog posts, you notice the arc of my political interests.  I’ll link to a representative sample here:

Early

The School Lunch Barometer – NYTimes.com

Alcatraz American Indian Occupation Graffiti Preserved – NYTimes.com

Mid-Range

Good Neighbors, Bad Border – NYTimes.com

http://www.jonathanbfisher.net/2012/05/01/the-imperiled-promise-of-college-nytimes-com/

http://www.jonathanbfisher.net/2014/07/22/its-another-perfect-day-in-tibet-nytimes-com/

Recent Past

Ideology Seen as Factor in Closings in University of North Carolina System – NYTimes.com

 

How Can We Build Anti-Racist White Educators?

One teacher reflects on what he and other white educators need to understand as they work to build anti-racist practices and identities.

Source: How Can We Build Anti-Racist White Educators?

This is a great, short piece from a periodical that I subscribe to online called Teaching Tolerance.  The title is a little misleading– or maybe it’s kind of a bait-and-switch. That is, I think the editors went with the word ‘tolerance’ because this more passe term gives you alliteration with ‘teaching.’  But don’t fooled, the contents is a much more robust anti-racism than the title would suggest.  However, the articles and hands-on, project-based, deeply reflective pieces in Teach Tolerance make it accessible across a broad spectrum of teachers, including those who may not be as well versed with the latest radical jargon etc., but teachers who are committed to making their teaching more just.

Also, this piece reminded me how much I really need to read more deeply in James Baldwin’s oeuvre.

Teachers donating sick days is a symptom of a wretched system

On July 24, Florida high school teacher Robert Goodman posted a picture of himself during chemo treatment. Having run short on sick days, Goodman appealed to fellow school employees, who donated enough days for him to take a semester off and complete treatment.
Goodman’s is one in a slew of stories about teachers and workers donating sick time or parental leave, a trend lauded earlier this summer by Good Morning America. But while it’s heartwarming to see the extent to which teachers support each other, part of the reason that’s true is that teachers have become so acutely economically vulnerable. As his students start school this week without him, lack of paid leave — for personal sickness like Goodman’s, the birth or adoption of a child, or to care for a loved one — shows just how vulnerable teachers are, and how inhumane the system has become.

AP World History Is Worth Saving

Teachers are pushing back against proposed changes they say would reframe AP World History as Eurocentric. Teaching Tolerance stands with them.

Source: AP World History Is Worth Saving

The College Board, which makes these tests, should be coming out with a response to all of the teachers who have told them what a terrible, dishonest switcheroo this would be.

Also, one argument that I didn’t hear Teaching Tolerance making has to do with other existing AP history courses– namely AP European and US History (and to some extent AP Art History) which between them seem to duplicate most of the material that would be covered in an AP world history course from 1400 to the present.