Struggling against the system in ourselves: criticism and self-criticism – Komun Academy

Many people are interested in the system of criticism and self-criticism and methods of personality development within the Kurdish liberation movement. The movement’s education is not only a way of accumulating knowledge, but also a practice of liberating personalities that have been shaped and formed by the dominant system of capitalist, patriarchal society. As freedom […]

Source: Struggling against the system in ourselves: criticism and self-criticism – Komun Academy

I’ve been learning a lot from using the “Tekmil” method described in this article in an anti-racist group I’ve been participating in associated with Seattle DSA.  I can definitely attest to the difficulty of being self-critical, and of being critical of the collective work of a group I believe in very strongly.  The more I think over this difficulty, and the difficulty of voicing meaningful self-criticism and group criticism, the more valueable I feel this tool (Tekmil) becoming in breaking down the white supremacy, misogyny, and capitalist mindset that I inhabit.

A People of Color’s History of DSA, Part 1: Socialism, Race, and the Formation of DSA by David Roddy & Alyssa De La Rosa (Sacramento DSA)

One of the most serious and divisive issues facing DSA since its membership explosion is how socialists should approach the issue of race and racism. Numerous pages of online left-wing periodicals, Medium posts, and Facebook threads have poured over the issue, with political positions varying widely from accepting the liberal framework of class and race as separate issues or the old “class struggle first” tendency of leftists to sideline anti-racist struggles. What most of the articles fail to articulate, however, is that DSA did not form after Trump was elected. In fact, this debate has raged within the organization since its founding in 1982.

Source: A People of Color’s History of DSA, Part 1: Socialism, Race, and the Formation of DSA

Washington D.C.’s “Witness Trees”: Silent Sentinels of Storied Landscapes – National Mall and Memorial Parks (U.S. National Park Service)

As the spring blossoms appear, including the Kwanzan cherry trees, gifts of the Japanese government, planted along the Tidal Basin in front of the Jefferson Memorial (and on the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle!), this article is a in important reminder that politics has always had an ecological context.

Source: Silent Sentinels of Storied Landscapes – National Mall and Memorial Parks (U.S. National Park Service)

Remembering the night two atomic bombs fell—on North Carolina (National Geographic)

U.S. Airforce image shows undetonated nuclear bomb with deployed parachute entangled in some tree branches adjacent to a cotton field in rural eastern North Carolina.

 

Sixty years ago, at the height of the Cold War, a B-52 bomber disintegrated over a small Southern town. An eyewitness recalls what happened next.

Source: Remembering the night two atomic bombs fell—on North Carolina